How to Get a Medical Marijuana Card via Telemedicine

By Charles Alovisetti, Brandon Kurtzman

Apr 16, 2020

Since COVID-19 has limited patient ability to get in-person consultations and examinations with health care providers, how does one go about obtaining a medical marijuana patient certification? Some states have allowed consultations with health care providers via telemedicine or over the phone in this unprecedented time. We have begun compiling guides for some of these states below, and we will continue to add more. 

CONTENTS:    Colorado   |   Massachusetts


Colorado

On March 20, Governor Jared Polis suspended the need for physical examinations to obtain a medical marijuana card for a 30-day period. This period ends on April 18, 2020.

Qualifying Conditions for Medical Cannabis

  • Cancer
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV or AIDS
  • Cachexia
  • Persistent muscle spasms
  • Seizures
  • Severe nausea
  • Severe pain
  • Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  • An Autism Spectrum Disorder
  • Any condition for which a physician could prescribe an opioid

 Additional Eligibility Requirements

  • Adults
    • Must be a Colorado resident
    • Must be 18 or older
    • Must have a qualifying medical condition
  • Minors
    • Minor and the primary parent must be Colorado residents
    • Minor must have a qualifying medical condition​

Steps to Obtain a Medical Marijuana Certification

Before registering as a patient, you need to receive a certification from a qualified medical provider. To do so, schedule an appointment with a certified medical provider and ask about medical marijuana. Once you are certified/approved, the qualified medical provider will give you the information necessary to register as a patient and apply for your Colorado medical marijuana card.

Telemedicine Provider Options*

 


Massachusetts

On March 23, 2020, Governor Charlie Baker ordered all businesses that are not offering essential services to close operations from noon on March 24, 2020, until noon on April 7, 2020, which was subsequently extended to May 4, 2020. The Cannabis Control Commission (the Commission) then issued a cease and desist order to all adult-use cannabis retailers demanding that they suspend their adult-use services. However, Governor Baker deemed Medical Marijuana Treatment Centers (MTCs) and Certifying Health Care Providers to be essential services that will remain open.

As stated in the Commission’s March 20, 2020 bulletin, providers may seek a waiver to certify new patients virtually over the phone or via telehealth for the Medical Use of Marijuana Program. The vast majority of providers have sought and been granted this waiver, although some have not or are still awaiting approval. The Commission remains open and will continue to process patient registrations throughout this period.

Qualifying Conditions for Medical Cannabis

  • Cancer
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV
  • AIDS
  • Hepatitis C
  • ALS
  • Crohn's Disease
  • Parkinson's Disease
  • Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
  • Other debilitating conditions as determined in writing by a provider

Additional Eligibility Requirements

  • Adults
    • Must be a Massachusetts resident
    • Must be 18 years of age or older
    • Must be diagnosed by a Provider as having a debilitating medical condition
  • Minors
    • Must be a Massachusetts resident
    • Must be diagnosed by two Massachusetts licensed Certifying Physicians (at least one of whom is a board-certified pediatrician or board-certified pediatric specialist) as having a debilitating medical condition that is also a life-limiting illness

Steps to Obtaining a Medical Marijuana Certification

Before registering as a patient with the Medical Use of Marijuana Program, you need to receive a certification from a registered provider. First, schedule an appointment with a provider and ask about the Medical Use of Marijuana Program. Once certified, your provider will give you the information necessary to register as a patient with the Medical Use of Marijuana Program.

Telemedicine Provider Options*

This article is for informational purposes only and not for the purpose of providing legal or tax advice. You should contact your attorney to obtain advice with respect to any particular issue or problem. This material may be considered attorney advertising under certain rules of professional conduct.